Room Redos

Put a (Base)Board on It!

October 22, 2015

If you’ve been wondering why we haven’t really posted on our bathroom renovation lately, it’s because we’ve given up. With everything that has gone wrong, we’ve decided to just quit refinishing it, close and lock the door, and forget that room is even there. We don’t really need it, right? JUST kidding! But, I won’t lie, we did discuss this as an option. This less than 6 ft wide space is now taking longer than the full kitchen remodel that we did 2 years ago. If you’re new or want to catch up, you can read about our half-bath misadventures here: Pt. 1Pt. 2Pt. 3Pt. 4/ Pt. 5

For the last two weekends, I have thought to myself, “Okay, this is the weekend! We’re going to finish this bathroom this weekend and finally get to do a reveal post on the blog.” And every weekend it seems like we take more steps back than forward. (Example: I was attempting to paint another coat on the wall, but I couldn’t figure out while my roller was leaving little blacks dots everywhere. Then I realized my roller had mold in it. What the heck?! That’s certainly never happened before.) But occasionally… somethings do turn out well.

We finally sorted out our pipe issue! Forgive me for bold, yelling fonts, but that pipe was the bane of our existence! If you remember, at the beginning of our bathroom remodel I removed a crazy looking baseboard to find a pipe outside of the drywall.

bathroom renovations mishaps |here-lately.com

(Yeh. “What the heck?!” was my reaction, too.)

Apparently, the builders forgot to run the pipe before the foundation was poured, so they just ran it near the bottom of the drywall. At least that’s what our plumber told us when we paid him $195 to come and see what he could do with it. He couldn’t remove it or recess it further into the wall, but he did straighten it and add a corner piece, which I consider better than nothing, because that pipe was all kinds of crooked.

bathroom renovations | here-lately.com

But after the pipe was “fixed” we were left with the task of figuring out how to cover it. That’s where our carpenter friend, Josh, comes in. He suggested that we use a router to notch out a space for the pipe in the baseboard. He also offered to do it for us. Isn’t it wonderful to have friends who know how to do stuff?

First we needed to find a baseboard that was thick enough to be notched out. We ended up landing on this 1″ thick moulding from Lowe’s:

bathroom baseboards | here-lately.com

It’s certainly more curvy than anything we would typically pick (and more expensive at $1.99 a foot), but it was thick enough and better looking than the other options, so we went with it.

We only needed to have one piece routed, so Michael measured everything, mitered the edges, and installed the baseboards on the other 4 walls. While he was doing that, I took the 5th baseboard to Josh so he could work his carpentry magic on it. So this is Josh’s routing table:

routing table | here-lately.com

Here’s a picture of Josh (everyone say, “Hi!” to Josh) running the baseboard through the router:

routing baseboards | here-lately.com

 

I’m not exactly sure about all the terminology and whatnot, but basically the router bit stuck up through that small hole in the table, and then Josh put the baseboard flush against those wood pieces, and pushed it past the router bit. He ran it through a few times to gradually get it to the right height, and when he was done we had this:

routing a baseboard to fit over a pipe |here-lately.com

We did a dry fit, and it’s going work perfectly over that pipe! Hallelujah! We do have to be careful with that thin section in the middle there, but we’ll be nailing it at the top only (putting a nail through that pipe is that last thing we need), so it should be fine. Whew! Pipe crisis resolved! We’ll share pictures when we get it installed and painted – Heck! Maybe we’ll be able to finally post some after photos of the whole room!

*Disclaimer: Please be advised that this post contains overuse of the word “heck”. Also, I know nothing about making a routing table, or what sized bit was used. If you have questions like this, leave a comment, and perhaps Josh will stop by and answer them. Josh was not paid for helping us. He helped based on the agreed upon social construct of friendship. He has not agreed, however, to answer any of your questions. Answering the questions of strangers is not part of the friendship construct. He’s a nice guy though, so he probably would anyway. If you’re still reading this, you should know that I’ve really just been writing this for the heck of it (see first sentence of this disclaimer).*

 

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